GilbertMakore's Blog

Based on ongoing and closer analysis, I would like to add my voice to the national and, indeed, International debate on #ThisFlag and whether or not it will be a success. I am currently in Harare, Zimbabwe and therefore have the vantage point of being closer to the action than most analysts.
#ThisFlag will fail because the movement or platform does not have a clear and concisely written Proposal. The movement also does not have a logical framework and no theory of change. Resultantly it is very difficult to understand; the ultimate goal/purpose; the intermediate outcomes, the outputs and even the inputs. It is not clear if whether or not the movement has achieved its objectives already. This will make it difficult to do an effective mid-term and or end –term evaluation.
The fuzziness of the movement’s objectives is not made any better by the fact that no baseline was conducted. How will the movement track progress against milestones when no baseline was conducted? The movement is also not clear on whether or not it will produce knowledge products or compendiums. The communication and advocacy strategy is not clear. While it is good that the movement got airtime on ZiFM and now on international news networks, this has not been well structured. The movement did not send a movement delegation to the recent AU Summit in Kigali.
The movement does not have a clear organizational structure. It is not clear if Pastor Evan Mawarire sits in the Board (if there is a Board) or if he is the Executive Director (if there is a Secretariat) or if he is the Spokesperson or if he is all those rolled into one. This movement seems like a briefcase NGO. It is not clear who initiatied #ThisFlag events in Cape Town, Johannesburg, Nottingham, London, Leeds, Washington DC, Perth and Vancouver when the movement does not have any regional structures, offices and representatives.
The face of the movement, Pastor Evan Mawarire also does not have a clear track record in activism and civil society work. This possibly explains why there have been no workshops, national dialogue conferences and seminars to interrogate, in-depth, the issues of corruption, poverty and injustice.
I recommend, as a matter of urgency
1. A change of name from #ThisFlag to something that can be formulated into an acronym
2. A Baseline Survey
3. A Proposal (along with a clear Theory of Change, a logical framework and outcomes mapping doc)
4. A Communications and Advocacy Strategy
5. A Monitoring, Evaluation Strategy
6. The recruitment of a Monitoring, Evaluation , Accountability and Learning Officer (MEAL Officer)
7. Organizational development for the Board and Secretariat
8. That they consider setting up national and regional offices
9. That the leader, Pastor Evan, go back to school and explore courses such as Development Studies, International Relations etc

I often read my daughter a bedtime story. She absolutely loves it. The one thing that easily puts my daughter to sleep is me picking up a good book and reading for her.

One day I had tucked her in already when I realised there wasn’t a book close by. I then decided to tell her a story from my head. Not a story I have heard before. Not a story I have read before. A new story. One I would make up right there and then.

It was agonising in a fun way and she absolutely loved it. The next night she asked that she tells a story ‘from my head daddy’. It was a messy and crazy story but it was fun.

I got to realise that I had, very slowly and almost imperceptibly,  lost the art of story-telling.

It reminded me of when I spent a couple of months living in Anchorage, Alaska in the USA. My hosts and friends in Alaska introduced me to a show called ‘The Arctic Entries ‘.

The organisers of this show would have themes for stories. December 2015 themes included ‘ Oops! Stories of Mistakes, Lucky Breaks, and Narrow Escapes‘ and ‘Talk to the Hand: Stories of Taking a Stand, Getting Scorned, and Doing It Your Way‘. The show would approach people or ask people to propose participants to tell their based stories on-stage. It was such a fun and amazing experience.

I think I might convene such a show at some point in the future. Meanwhile, let me challenge you today -try making up a story that actually makes sense, is engaging and fun. You will fall over yourself but you’ll enjoy it.

I often read my daughter a bedtime story. She absolutely loves it. The one thing that easily puts my daughter to sleep is me picking up a good book and reading for her.

One day I had tucked her in already when I realised there wasn’t a book close by. I then decided to tell her a story from my head. Not a story I have heard for. Not a story I have read before. A new story. One I would make up right there and then.

It was agonising in a fun way and she absolutely loved it. The next night she asked that she tells a story ‘from my head daddy’. It was a messy and crazy story but it was fun.

I got to realise that I had, very slowly and almost imperceptibly,  lost the art of story-telling.

It reminded me of when I spent a couple of months living in Anchorage, Alaska in the USA. My hosts and friends in Alaska introduced me to a show called ‘The Arctic Entries ‘.

The organisers of this show would have themes for stories. December 2015 themes included ‘ Oops! Stories of Mistakes, Lucky Breaks, and Narrow Escapes‘ and ‘Talk to the Hand: Stories of Taking a Stand, Getting Scorned, and Doing It Your Way‘. The show would approach people or ask people to propose participants to tell their based stories on-stage. It was such a fun and amazing experience.

I think I might convene such a show at some point in the future. Meanwhile, try making up a story that actually makes sense, is engaging and fun. You will fall over yourself but you’ll enjoy it.

Lately, I  have been doing a lot of thinking around ‘discipline’ and ‘habit forming’. This has largely been motivated by my self reflection on how I have now firmly picked up the habit of running 3kms at least 4-5 days a week and plugging in a much longer run on Saturdays. For the first 9 months of 2015 and much of the years before, my running had pretty much been on and off.

So how did I eventually successfully pick up this habit? The biggest factor may have been my recent job change. In my previous role I traveled. A LOT. This just made consistent  running often difficult. The job change also possibly acted as a psychological trigger to start afresh with respect to other areas of my life.

But what really got me thinking is why it is difficult to use the discipline of mastery over onr habit across the many habits that you may want to form.

So. Why is it difficult, for example, to successfully build the habit of writing daily or weekly when you have successfully built the  habit of running daily or weekly? Why is it difficult to get a handle over what you eat when you have the discipline to pray everyday or the disciple to read or write every day?

At the end of every year I often find time to reflect on how people around me managed to push me to achieve more. This reflection is often private but I just decided to do a public post for 2015. Below is a list of people that helped make 2015 awesome for me. They challenged me and they pushed me forward.

Dr Hamadziripi Tamukamoyo– A mentor and friend. Very few people literally fight in my corner and for me as much as HT. I often wonder what I would ever do to repay this gentleman for the time he invests in me.

Mutuso Dhliwayo and Shamiso Mtisi– These two gentlemen consistently (as they have done over the last 7 years of us working together) challenged me to do more and do it better. It is unremarkable to think you a good manager. It is truly remarkable for your team and employees to say you are arguably the best in the business. You modeled that development (NGO) does not have to be considered mainstream to be excellent. For hunkering down and building ZELA from a little unknown outfit to a significant force. I learnt so much. We learnt so much together. For demonstrating what creating opportunities for growth actually means. And for creating an organisation with possibly the best culture out there.

Pastor Evan Mawarire (Pastor E)– Teaching me how to dream and to literally living the maxim ‘ Just do it’. This man jumps off the cliff every.single.day.

Otto Saki– For thinking of ways to assist me even without my knowledge. What strikes me is it is in his nature to do that. Helped me understand what to be a ‘node in a network’ actually means.

Titus Gwemende– For consistently asking me the question ‘ What next?’

Carol Kiangura– You demonstrated what it means to have  the disciple of execution and I learnt a ton on organisational development

Mukasiri Sibanda– What a year! We took on projects we did not even have qualifications for. We worked on some cool stuff! You taught me courage.

Edmond Kangamungazi– For being an all round good guy. For demonstrating that you do not have to be mean to be win.

Rumbi Katedza– For demonstrating what it means to be dedicated to a craft. This one person takes her work very seriously. Learnt a ton.

Richard Everett– had an opportunity to work together on a short project. Learnt what excellence means

My prayer is that I challenged and pushed forward the people around me as well.

 

 

 

2015 has pretty much come and gone and as always, there were interesting and not so interesting developments in Zimbabwe’s mining sector. Here’s what happened;

  1. It was confirmed that the country had all but run out of alluvial diamonds
  2. The government has since moved to consolidate the diamond mining companies including Marange Resources, Mbada Diamonds, Jinan, Diamond Mining Corporation and Anjin.
  3. Murowa Diamonds, which operates far from the ‘maddening crowd’ was somehow roped into the consolidation plans. The Australian company running Muwrowa Diamonds, Rio Tinto, balked and divested from Zimbabwe.
  4. Talking of foreign investing and divesting, Mwana Africa is now known as Asa Resources after Chinese investment in Mwana Africa
  5. The government lifted the ban onraw chrome exports and signed importation deals (including for tantalite) with Chinese Investors
  6. ACR, which got caught up in the Marange diamond mining furore, changed its name to Vast Resources and has invested in Pickstone-Peerless Gold Mine in Shurugwi
  7. Gold deliveries to Fidelity Printers soared to over 18 tonnes Jan-September 2015
  8. The Auditor General made it publicly known that ZMDC was riddled with maladministration (and this is such understatement on my part)
  9. The Auditor General also made it known that EMA is not doing a good job on following up on EIAs in the mining sector, mainly due to lack of resources
  10. The involuntarily displaced of Chiadzwa are still waiting for compensation, five years after being moved to pave way for diamond mining
  11. Incidentally, the nation is also still waiting…..waiting for a new Mines and Minerals Act
  12. It remains unclear if the Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment Act will be reviewed. Government imposed an export tax on raw platinum exports to force companies to commit to beneficiation plans
  13. Meanwhile the sector has been hamstrung by energy challenges
  14. The government after much prevarication eventually confirmed the collapse of the Zisco-Essar deal
  15. Internationally, the campaign against Illicit Financial Flows gained momentum against the back of the Mbeki Report.
  16. The 3rd Financing for Development Conference was a dud as there was not enough commitment to addressing IFFs and establishing a tax body
  17. International commodity prices have been tumbling and companies are reeling
  18. The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) re-issued a draft rule for Sec 1504 of the 2010 Act that will make public the payments by corporations to governments in the extractive sector
  19. New rules under Canada’s Extractive Sector Transparency Measures Act (ESTMA) which govern extractive sector transparency came into effect, forcing all extractive companies subject to the Act to report payments including taxes, royalties, fees and production entitlements of $100 000 or more to all levels of government in Canada and abroad.

Last week I visited Mhondongori (Ward 5) in Runde in rural Zvishavane. We were having a dialogue on public participation in Community Share Ownership Trust Schemes established under the Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment Act. During these conversations, an elderly lady requested that she ask a question. The question was decidedly off-topic but gravely important.

Her question was ‘ Mukoma Gilbert, ndinechibage changu chakatorwa ne GMB gore rapera muna June, ndanga ndichidawo kuziva kuti tichabhadharwa rinhi?’ (I delivered maize to the Grain Marketing Board in June 2014, do you have any idea when I will be paid?).

I had heard that GMB owes farmers across the country. But you do not realise the import of this situation unless and until you begin talking to the affected farmers. I asked follow up questions to this lady and the community members and realised that there were many that were affected. One gentleman delivered 16 tonnes to the GMB. The price they were selling the maize for was $390/tonne. He has $6 240.00 locked up with the GMB for almost a year. Another delivered 5 tonnes. The elderly lady that asked the question delivered 1 tonne. Yet the fact that she had not been paid meant that she is struggling to buy basic food necessitates and pay school fees for her child. These farmers had to pay for their own transport costs to deliver the maize. The gentleman who delivered 5 tonnes used $200 for transporting the maize. These are farmers that have not necessarily benefit from the GMB inputs scheme.

This state of affairs is certainly not made easy by the poor and or erratic rainfall across much of the country. These farmers face hunger. Hunger made worse by the fact that the safety net of proceeds from the previous harvest is simply not there.

I could not give her an answer. The life of any farmer is not easy (I know, my father is a farmer) but the life of a subsistence rural farmer is incredibly tough.  I do not know when GMB/ our government plans to pay these farmers for what they worked so hard for in very difficult circumstances. What I do know is that this is not just. It is criminal.

Twitter

My Slideshare-Books and Presos

View GilbertMakore's profile on slideshare

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: